The COVID-19 outbreak has changed the way that we go about our daily routines and special occasions. While the pandemic has halted several things in our world, it has not kept people from moving. It’s challenging to do everyday, ordinary things like going to the grocery store. Then, amplify the challenges when you have to move to a new house. 

With a few tips, moving to a new home in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic can be done. These tips will help ease the stress of moving to a new house. 

 

What is COVID-19?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines COVID-19 as a novel (new) coronavirus that spreads from person to person through respiratory droplets. Research shows that the droplets are expelled from the mouth and nose when people cough, sneeze, talk, laugh or sing. In response, the CDC recommends social distancing practices. 

 

Is It Safe to Move During COVID-19?

The short answer is yes, in most cases. Some people have to move, simply because their jobs demand they move to meet the needs at work. These types of moves have rigid moving dates, so people cannot wait until social distancing measures have been removed. 

People who have to move need to have safety protocols in place. But, for some people who have pre-existing conditions like asthma, diabetes, or heart disease, they might want to consider postponing their moving date or find an alternative way to move to keep strangers from entering their homes. 

 

How Can Social Distancing Affect My Move?

To prevent the spread of COVID-19, the CDC recommends social distancing or remaining at least six feet away from people who are not in your safety bubble. The CDC recommends avoiding being around groups of people who are not members of your household. They also recommend avoiding mass gatherings. 

So, if you are moving, social distancing can be tough to maintain. Movers need to enter your home to move furniture. Full-service movers need to help you pack your things. So, if the movers are not members of your home, it is tough to maintain a six-foot distance from them. 

 

How Can I Move During COVID-19?: Best Practices For a Safe Move

Since the last pandemic, the Spanish Flu, was in 1918, most people do not have experience moving in the midst of a public health emergency. So, preparing for a major move is more stressful than it is in normal circumstances. 

 

Preparing for the Move how to move during pandemic

To make moving day as easy as possible, here are some several steps you should take to prepare yourself and your home. 

Efficiently Plan and Double Check the Details of Your Move

Before you move, you should talk to your moving company to confirm your reservation. The moving company can tell you about their social-distancing policies, so you know what they can and cannot do. It is best to ask them questions before the day of the move so you can be fully prepared for anything that could happen that day. 

Buy All New Packing Supplies in One Trip

Because of safety purposes, it is best to pick up your packing supplies in one trip to the store. It is also a good idea to only use new boxes. If you use old boxes, you could bring the virus into your home. You might even end up with boxes that have bugs or are too weak to support the weight of your belongings.

Clean and Sanitize as You Pack Your Belongings

When you pack your belongings, take the time to clean and sanitize them. Wipe everything you can with disinfectants, so you do not bring germs into your new home. It is better to clean as you pack since you already have to touch all of your belongings to put them into the boxes. 

Before you begin packing and cleaning, read the instructions to be sure you don’t use a cleaning product that could cause damage.

 

During the Move

This is where things get stressful, especially if you aren’t prepared. Knowing what is coming will help you be ready for it. 

Maintain Social Distancing During the Move

To stay safe, you should try to position yourself far away from the movers. Let them do their job, and you stay close enough to answer questions if needed. It is advisable to have all of the boxes packed and taped so that they can do their job efficiently.

Provide Hygiene and Sanitizing Products

You can help your movers by offering them hand sanitizer, a hand-washing station, gloves, and masks. Don’t be surprised if they already have their own personal protective gear, but it can’t hurt to have extras around. 

Follow CDC Protocols to Avoid the Spread of the Virus

The CDC recommends wearing masks when you cannot maintain social distancing. Also, follow their other protocols, such as not sharing food and not touching your face. Disinfect countertops and other common areas, as well. 

how to move during coronavirus

After the Move

When your home is empty, there are a few things you can do to add convenience to your move. 

Clean and Disinfect Your New Home Before Unpacking and Settling in

Before you start unpacking boxes, take time to clean, sanitize, and disinfect your new home. Don’t forget to clean inside of cupboards as well as sanitize high-touch items like light switches and doorknobs, too. 

 

How to Choose a Moving Company During the Coronavirus Pandemic

With COVID-19 restrictions in many states, you will most likely need to get a moving quote online. Many moving companies will not enter your home for quotes. You should choose a company that follows CDC guidelines, so they keep you and your family safe. Ask questions before you commit to hiring a moving company. 

 

Measures that NDMS is Taking During the Pandemic to Keep You Safe

Moving involves entering homes and touching belongings. So, the NDMS is working hard to keep crews and families safe. They are using virtual surveys, temperature checks, and masking policies to keep their employees safe. They ask that families do their part to keep moving crews safe, too. 

Moving during a pandemic is stressful and may involve complications. However, it can be possible to move safely with proper planning and following recommended protocols such as social distancing and correct hygiene practices.